Longitudinal relationships between sensory gating, cognition, clinical symptoms and real-life functioning in early psychosis

Shen Li, PhD

McLean Hospital
Longitudinal relationships between sensory gating, cognition, clinical symptoms and real-life functioning in early psychosis

Scientific Abstract

Background: Diminished sensory gating (SG) is a robust finding in psychotic disorders, but studies of early psychosis (EP) are rare. Also, it is unknown whether SG deficit leads to poor neurocognitive, social, and/or real-world functioning. Our study aimed to explore the longitudinal relationships between SG and these variables and the effects of diagnoses (schizophrenia: SZ vs. bipolar: BP) over a 2-year follow-up.

Methods: Seventy-one EP patients (SZ: n=25; BP: n=46) and 88 healthy controls (HCs) were recruited at baseline. Thirty-three and 20 EP patients completed 12-month and 24-month follow-up, respectively. SG was measured using auditory dual-click (S1&S2) paradigm and quantified as P50 ratio (S2/S1) and S1-S2 difference at Cz site. Cognition, real-life functioning, and symptoms were assessed using the MATRICS Consensus Cognitive Battery (MCCB), Global Functioning: Social and Role, Multnomah Community Ability Scale (MCAS), Awareness of Social Inference Test Revised (TASIT), and the Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale (PANSS). ANOVA, chi-square, mixed model, correlation and regression analyses were used for group comparisons and relationships among variables.

Results: At baseline, there were no significant group differences in ratio or S1-S2 difference. In EP patients, P50 ratio was significantly increased at 24-month compared with the baseline (p=0.033); S1-S2 difference showed significant difference at 24-month (p<0.001). At baseline, MCCB Social sub-score was associated with P50 ratio in total participants (p=0.033); in EP patients, MCAS-social sub-score was associated to S1-S2 difference (p=0.040); in BP patients, GF-social was associated to S2 amplitude (p=0.001). Neither P50 ratio nor S1-S2 difference were predictive of function at follow-up.

Conclusion: SG in EP patients becomes abnormal as the disease progress. SG and its amplitudes are related to social and real-life functioning cross-sectionally, but not predictive of future functions and cognition.

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research Areas

Authors

Shen Li, PhD, Shi Yu Chan, PhD, Amy Higgins, MS, Mei-Hua Hall, PhD