Assessing the validity of the DSM-5 Self-Rated Level 1 Cross-Cutting Symptom Measure-Adult as a predictor of clinician-rated psychosis, depression, anxiety, and mania

Tabinda Khan, BA

Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center
Assessing the validity of the DSM-5 Self-Rated Level 1 Cross-Cutting Symptom Measure-Adult as a predictor of clinician-rated psychosis, depression, anxiety, and mania

Scientific Abstract

Background: The DSM-5 Self-Rated Level 1 Cross-Cutting Symptom Measure-Adult is a self- rated questionnaire to assess patient psychiatric symptoms over a range of mental health issues. Patients rate how bothered they have been by 23 symptoms over the past 2 weeks. They score 0 (none), 1 (slight), 2 (mild), 3 (moderate), or 4 (severe). This measure is meant to flag mental health domains for clinicians to further investigate, including depression, anger, mania, anxiety, somatic symptoms, suicidal ideation, psychosis, sleep problems, memory issues, repetitive thoughts and behaviors, dissociation, personality functioning, and substance use. First released in 2013, there is still limited literature on the validity of this measure.

Methods: 77 adults (aged 18-60) from the BSNIP-2 Study Boston site with SCID–IV diagnosed psychotic disorders completed the DSM-5 Cross-Cutting Symptom Measure within two weeks of clinician-completed Montgomery and Asberg Depression Rating Scale (MADRS), Clinical Anxiety Scale (CAS), Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale (PANSS), and Young Mania Rating Scale (YMRS) clinical measures. Pearson correlations were run between corresponding Cross-Cutting Symptoms domains and total MADRS, CAS, PANSS, and YMRS scores.

Results: Significant positive correlations were found between depression, anxiety, and psychosis domain scores and total scores for each corresponding clinical measure (p < 0.001). Correlations of R=0.713 (p=5.102e-13) between depression domain scores and MADRS total scores, R=0.800 (p<2.2e-16) between anxiety domain scores and CAS total scores, and R=0.740 (p=1.524e-14) between psychosis domain scores and PANSS Positive total scores were found. There was no strong correlation found between mania domain scores and the YMRS total scores (R=0.223, p=0.051).

Conclusions: The DSM-5 Cross-Cutting Symptom Measure functions as a valid measure of depression, anxiety, and psychosis when compared to the MADRS, CAS, and PANSS clinical measures, but is not a strong predictor of mania when compared to the YMRS.

Live Zoom Session – April 21st

research Areas

Authors

Tabinda Khan, BA, Courtney Spitzer, BA, Gautami Shashidhar, BA, Matcheri S. Keshavan, MD

Principal Investigator

Matcheri S. Keshavan, MD