Associations between neurophysiological and cognitive deficits in patients with psychosis: an analysis of the N1, P2 and MMN event related potentials (ERPs)

Jaelin D. Rippe, BA

McLean Hospital
Associations between neurophysiological and cognitive deficits in patients with psychosis: an analysis of the N1, P2 and MMN event related potentials (ERPs)

Scientific Abstract

Background: Both cognitive performance and ERP components have been shown to be impaired in people with psychosis, however the extent to which specific cognitive domains are related to specific ERP components is unclear. Additionally, there is evidence for sex differences in the N1/P2 ERPs and some aspects of cognitive performance in healthy controls. We analyzed the relationships between specific domains of cognition and three ERPs (N1, P2 and MMN) to determine if neurophysiological ERP deficits correlate with cognition in psychosis and if sex is a mediator of this relationship.

Methods: Data of demographics, cognition (assessed with the MATRICS Consensus Cognitive Battery, MCCB) and three ERP components (mismatch negativity [MMN], N1 and P2) were collected using auditory oddball paradigms in 38 patients with psychosis.

Results: Several cognitive domains were significantly correlated with N1 and P2 ERP components including attention, working memory, verbal learning and problem solving. Specifically, better attention, working memory and verbal learning performance was associated with greater P2 latency, and better problem solving performance was associated with increased N1 amplitude. Contrary to our hypotheses, we found no significant effect of sex or diagnosis on any EEG or cognitive measure.

Conclusions: Our results support N1/P2 being involved in attention-modulated processes required for cognitive function. Specifically, reduced (more impaired) N1 amplitude may be associated with decreased problem solving ability. Longer P2 latency may index greater attentional resources required for stimulus classification processing and may be associated with better attention, working memory, and verbal learning performance. The specificity of N1/P2 ERPs in associations with distinct cognitive domains suggests that different constituents along the information processing pipeline may uniquely impact specific cognitive functions. These associations did not appear to differ by diagnosis or sex in our sample.

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research Areas

Authors

Jaelin D. Rippe, BA, Mei-Hua Hall, PhD, Kathryn Eve Lewandowski, PhD

Principal Investigator

Mei-Hua Hall, PhD, Kathryn Eve Lewandowski, PhD